William Knox’s Counterrevolution

Posted on: April 15th, 2019 by Omohundro No Comments

Peter Walker is a lecturer in History at the University of Wyoming who studies early modern Britain, the British Empire, and the Atlantic World. He received his PhD from Columbia University in 2016 and his MPhil from the University of Oxford in 2010. He held an Omohundro Institute Fellowship for research at Windsor Castle in… Read More »

George IV, Prince of Wales, and the Habits of the Masquerade

Posted on: April 10th, 2019 by Omohundro No Comments

Meg Kobza is a third-year PhD candidate at Newcastle University, where she is working on the social history of the eighteenth-century British masquerade. Her research will shift the paradigm of scholarship on the masquerade away from literary analysis, which depicts the masquerade as a purely carnivalesque and debaucherous entertainment that flouted social distinctions. She argues… Read More »

Cutting, Slicing, Pasting: Royal Female Friendship and Domestic Craft

Posted on: April 6th, 2019 by Arthur Burns No Comments

by Dr Madeleine Pelling (University of York)   For elite and middling women in the eighteenth century, handicrafts including embroidery, decoupage, wood-cutting, turning and spinning were important activities in performing female sociability and manifesting rustic and picturesque ideals. The Georgian Papers Programme has recently digitized a key, though overlooked, album of cut-paper designs created by… Read More »

The GPP and Digital Humanities

Posted on: March 15th, 2019 by Arthur Burns No Comments

  On 12 March 2019 the Georgian Papers Programme delivered a seminar in the series run by the Digital History seminar at the Institute of Historical Research in London which was livestreamed on YouTube. Samantha Callaghan, Patricia Methven and Arthur Burns discussed and took questions about the importance of metadata and the plans for developing… Read More »

LESSONS FROM THE AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARY WAR: SIR HENRY CLINTON’S ANALYSIS OF THE ALLIED INVASION OF FRANCE, 1792

Posted on: March 6th, 2019 by Arthur Burns No Comments

By Dr Michael Rowe, Reader in European History, King’s College London On 20 September 1792, a French army some 32,000 strong defeated a slightly larger force of predominantly Prussian troops near the town of Valmy in north-eastern France. The battle is one of the most important in history. It was by no means the largest… Read More »

The Curious World of Benjamin Franklin: Hans Sloane, the British Museum, and an Asbestos Purse

Posted on: February 25th, 2019 by Omohundro No Comments

Emily Sneff is a graduate student in early American history at William & Mary and a Digital Apprentice at the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture. There is an object in the British Museum that was bought from Benjamin Franklin. A small asbestos “purse.” With only these details, the modern mind imagines the… Read More »

Sir Lewis Namier’s Additions and Corrections to Sir John Fortescue’s edition of the Correspondence of George III

Posted on: February 22nd, 2019 by Arthur Burns No Comments

Among the most important series of papers which the Georgian Papers Programme is digitizing for public access is George III’s official correspondence, otherwise known as the George III calendar and bearing the Catalogue identity GEO/MAIN. This series contains the main series of letters relating to George III’s involvement with the government of his realm as… Read More »

Fit for a King: Furnishing Hampton Court Palace for George II and His Family

Posted on: February 6th, 2019 by Omohundro No Comments

By Marie Pellissier, Omohundro Institute Apprentice, William & Mary Welcome back to our Georgian Goodies blog series, where we highlight interesting, timely, or just plain nifty documents from the Georgian Papers Programme! On June 24, 1737, King George II signed a warrant authorizing the purchase of furniture for the royal apartments at Hampton Court Palace.… Read More »

The Sandy Ground of Prince Edward: Profligacy and Royal Credit in the Empire of George III

Posted on: January 29th, 2019 by Omohundro No Comments

By Peter Olsen-Harbich Peter Olsen-Harbich spent the September of 2018 in the Royal Archives at Windsor as an Omohundro Institute–Georgian Papers Programme fellow and as the recipient of a William & Mary Dean’s Research Fund fellowship. The latter was jointly funded by the Omohundro Institute and the William & Mary Dean of the Faculty of… Read More »