Posts Tagged ‘military history’

LESSONS FROM THE AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARY WAR: SIR HENRY CLINTON’S ANALYSIS OF THE ALLIED INVASION OF FRANCE, 1792

By Dr Michael Rowe, Reader in European History, King’s College London On 20 September 1792, a French army some 32,000 strong defeated a slightly larger force of predominantly Prussian troops near the town of Valmy in north-eastern France. The battle is one of the most important in history. It was by no means the largest… Read More »

GEORGE III AND THE SEVENTY YEARS WAR, 1744–1815

As we begin to publish the main body of George III’s correspondence, we hope to provide an appropriate context for those approaching this remarkable series for the first time, reflecting the main new approaches that historians have been taking in the years since the bulk of the scholarship on George’s role in the polity was… Read More »

Understanding the American Revolution using George III’s archives

Professor Andrew O’Shaughnessy was the first Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) Visiting Professor in 2016. The generous support from the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) enables visiting professors to bring new perspectives to the study of texts uncovered by the Georgian Papers Programme (GPP). Here Professor O’Shaughnessy reflects on the highlights of his… Read More »