Posts Tagged ‘George IV’

Transcribe the Medical Papers of George III

Diagram of Timmermans' device

In coordination with Georgian Papers Programme London event Mental Health and the Georgian World,  the GPP transcription site, Transcribe Georgian Papers released three George III medical collections to transcribers. In this post we highlight the three collections, and provide transcription tips – George III medical papers George III’s medical papers primarily cover the Regency era,… Read More »

LESSONS FROM THE AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARY WAR: SIR HENRY CLINTON’S ANALYSIS OF THE ALLIED INVASION OF FRANCE, 1792

By Dr Michael Rowe, Reader in European History, King’s College London On 20 September 1792, a French army some 32,000 strong defeated a slightly larger force of predominantly Prussian troops near the town of Valmy in north-eastern France. The battle is one of the most important in history. It was by no means the largest… Read More »

Fading in to the Archives: Queen Charlotte’s (Missing) Papers

By Rachael Krier, Metadata Creator at the Royal Archives Who was Queen Charlotte? Wife of George III and mother to George IV (and many others) is only part of the answer. As with many queens in history, Queen Charlotte is often overshadowed by the larger personalities of her husband George III and her favourite son,… Read More »

Jane Austen and the Prince Regent: The Very First Purchase of an Austen Novel

During his time in the Royal Archives, Omohundro Institute Georgian Papers Programme fellow Nicholas Foretek found exciting new evidence that the first documented purchase of any novel by Jane Austen was made by none other than the Prince Regent (later George IV).  Moreover, the purchase—of Sense and Sensibility—was made two days before the book was advertised… Read More »

First King's College London Mount Vernon Fellow announced: Dr Jane Levi

    King’s College London and the Washington Library are pleased to announce the appointment of King’s’ first Mount Vernon Fellow, who will hold a fellowship established to reciprocate that established for the Georgian Papers Programme by the Mount Vernon Ladies Association. The fellowship is open to King’s’ staff and research students, and also to those… Read More »

Current research in the Georgian papers: a symposium to take stock, Windsor, 4 September 2017

By Arthur Burns, Academic Director of the Georgian Papers Programme, King’s College London As we launch the second tranche of digitized documents for the Georgian Papers project, this is a good moment to reflect on the progress of academic research related to the project. On 4 September 2017 the Royal Archives at Windsor Castle hosted… Read More »

Meeting the "humane and gracious sovereign"

by Cynthia Kierner, Omohundro Institute Georgian Papers Programme Fellow and Professor of History at George Mason University Looking through thousands of Hanoverian manuscripts in the Royal Archives at Windsor Castle was an amazing experience that gave me a deeper understanding of the Georgian era. The letters exchanged between George III and Lord North, for instance,… Read More »

New Exhibition on Georgian Papers Programme on display at King's College London

A new exhibition based on research undertaken on Georgian papers at the Royal Archives by King’s academic staff and students is now open to the public. The exhibition stems from work initially conducted as part of the King’s Undergraduate Research Fellowship scheme, in which students worked with King’s academics on a research project. The theme of… Read More »

Eye Surgery in the Georgian Age

Ayesha Hussain and Anna Maerker, Department of History, King’s College London                 In his old age, King George III suffered from blindness due to cataracts in both eyes.The affliction was movingly documented in portraits from 1820 by artists Charles Turner and Samuel William Reynolds (Figs.1-2). The King’s doctors… Read More »

Research in the Round Tower: Report from Rick Atkinson

by Rick Atkinson I’ve worked in some exotic locations—Mogadishu, Mali, Baghdad, Kazakhstan, Riyadh—but none more evocative than the top of the Round Tower in Windsor Castle, where I spent the month of April 2016, as a Georgian Papers fellow. The researcher’s path to this archive is steep: through the Henry VIII Gate and the Norman… Read More »