Posts Tagged ‘18th Century’

Uncovering Royal Perspectives on Slavery, Empire, and the Rights of Colonial Subjects

Posted on: January 21st, 2019 by Omohundro 1 Comment

By Brooke Newman Dr. Newman is Associate Professor of History and Associate Director of the Humanities Research Center at Virginia Commonwealth University. She was awarded an Omohundro Institute Georgian Papers Programme Fellowship in 2017. In 2017 I spent a month in the Royal Archives tracing how the Georgian monarchs responded to contemporary debates over the… Read More »

GEORGE III AND THE SEVENTY YEARS WAR, 1744–1815

Posted on: January 3rd, 2019 by Arthur Burns No Comments

As we begin to publish the main body of George III’s correspondence, we hope to provide an appropriate context for those approaching this remarkable series for the first time, reflecting the main new approaches that historians have been taking in the years since the bulk of the scholarship on George’s role in the polity was… Read More »

Illuminating the Virtuous King George III

Posted on: December 3rd, 2018 by Omohundro No Comments

Cassandra Good is an assistant professor of History at Marymount University in Arlington, Virginia. She was awarded an Omohundro Institute Georgian Papers Programme fellowship in 2017. Professor Good is currently working on a study of George Washington’s family in the late eighteenth and nineteenth century, examining how the next generation shaped the family’s public image… Read More »

Behind the Scenes in the Chapel Royal: The Chapel Royal Memorandum Book

Posted on: November 8th, 2018 by Omohundro No Comments

By Marie Pellissier, Omohundro Institute Apprentice, William & Mary Welcome back to our Georgian Goodies blog series, where we highlight interesting, timely, or just plain nifty documents from the Georgian Papers Programme! What’s so special about the Chapel Royal? That phrase refers not to the building itself, but to the group of people responsible for… Read More »

Ghosts! In the Archives! We Thought You Ought to Know

Posted on: October 22nd, 2018 by Omohundro No Comments

By Marie Pellissier, Omohundro Institute Apprentice, William & Mary Welcome back to our Georgian Goodies blog series, where we highlight interesting, timely, or just plain nifty documents from the Georgian Papers Programme! It’s almost Halloween! We may or may not have found some ghosts in the archives… but we shall leave the final determination about… Read More »

George III in London: What Hamilton Tells Us About the King’s Role

Posted on: August 28th, 2018 by Omohundro No Comments

by Arthur Burns (King’s College London) and Karin Wulf (Omohundro Institute) [After reading this, why not visit our virtual Hamilton and George III exhibition?]   We’ve written before for the Georgian Papers Programme about King George III in American popular culture, and about the importance of Hamilton to that oeuvre.  Seeing Michael Jibson in action in… Read More »

Jane Austen and the Prince Regent: The Very First Purchase of an Austen Novel

Posted on: July 24th, 2018 by Omohundro 2 Comments

During his time in the Royal Archives, Omohundro Institute Georgian Papers Programme fellow Nicholas Foretek found exciting new evidence that the first documented purchase of any novel by Jane Austen was made by none other than the Prince Regent (later George IV).  Moreover, the purchase—of Sense and Sensibility—was made two days before the book was advertised… Read More »

The 2018 Sons of the American Revolution Georgian Papers Programme annual lecture 2018

Posted on: February 12th, 2018 by Arthur Burns No Comments

Professor Gabriel Paquette (The Johns Hopkins University) Spain and the American Revolution Monday 26 March 2018, 6.30 pm Venue: The Great Hall, Strand Campus, King’s College London Professor Paquette lectured on Spain’s role in the American Revolution. He is especially interested in the Anglo-Spanish relationship, and the outbreak of war between these two countries in… Read More »

Hamilton’s George III in London

Posted on: December 6th, 2017 by Omohundro 1 Comment

by Karin Wulf Hamilton, a quintessentially American story, has arrived in London. While many American commenters and historians have focused on the “Ten Dollar Founding Father without a Father” and his compatriots, the racial politics of the founding period and the intentional casting of the musical, and the gendered politics of the Schuyler sisters and… Read More »