Posts Tagged ‘18th Century’

Transcribe the Medical Papers of George III

Diagram of Timmermans' device

In coordination with Georgian Papers Programme London event Mental Health and the Georgian World,  the GPP transcription site, Transcribe Georgian Papers released three George III medical collections to transcribers. In this post we highlight the three collections, and provide transcription tips – George III medical papers George III’s medical papers primarily cover the Regency era,… Read More »

Beginning with George: Rick Atkinson’s The British Are Coming

By Karin Wulf and Arthur Burns     Does the American Revolution begin with George III?  In Rick Atkinson’s new book, The British are Coming: The War for America, Lexington to Princeton, 1775-1777, the first volume in his planned trilogy on the military history of the Revolution, it does.  It begins, in fact, with the… Read More »

Sir Lewis Namier’s Additions and Corrections to Sir John Fortescue’s edition of the Correspondence of George III

Among the most important series of papers which the Georgian Papers Programme is digitizing for public access is George III’s official correspondence, otherwise known as the George III calendar and bearing the Catalogue identity GEO/MAIN. This series contains the main series of letters relating to George III’s involvement with the government of his realm as… Read More »

Fit for a King: Furnishing Hampton Court Palace for George II and His Family

By Marie Pellissier, Omohundro Institute Apprentice, William & Mary Welcome back to our Georgian Goodies blog series, where we highlight interesting, timely, or just plain nifty documents from the Georgian Papers Programme! On June 24, 1737, King George II signed a warrant authorizing the purchase of furniture for the royal apartments at Hampton Court Palace.… Read More »

The Sandy Ground of Prince Edward: Profligacy and Royal Credit in the Empire of George III

By Peter Olsen-Harbich Peter Olsen-Harbich spent the September of 2018 in the Royal Archives at Windsor as an Omohundro Institute–Georgian Papers Programme fellow and as the recipient of a William & Mary Dean’s Research Fund fellowship. The latter was jointly funded by the Omohundro Institute and the William & Mary Dean of the Faculty of… Read More »

Uncovering Royal Perspectives on Slavery, Empire, and the Rights of Colonial Subjects

King George III surrounded by nymphs representing Wisdom, Justice, Liberty, Science, Navigation and Commerce

By Brooke Newman Dr. Newman is Associate Professor of History and Associate Director of the Humanities Research Center at Virginia Commonwealth University. She was awarded an Omohundro Institute Georgian Papers Programme Fellowship in 2017. In 2017 I spent a month in the Royal Archives tracing how the Georgian monarchs responded to contemporary debates over the… Read More »

GEORGE III AND THE SEVENTY YEARS WAR, 1744–1815

As we begin to publish the main body of George III’s correspondence, we hope to provide an appropriate context for those approaching this remarkable series for the first time, reflecting the main new approaches that historians have been taking in the years since the bulk of the scholarship on George’s role in the polity was… Read More »

The 18th Century Materializes on Stage

By Karin Wulf and Arthur Burns There is so much eighteenth century on view in the much acclaimed Nottingham Playhouse staging of Alan Bennett’s The Madness of  George III.  The Georgian Papers Programme had a wonderful opportunity to host lead actor Mark Gatiss at Windsor Castle to view some of the archival materials selected to… Read More »

Musical Moments: Handel's "Messiah," Musical Patronage, and Princess Augusta

By Marie Pellissier, Omohundro Institute Apprentice, William & Mary Welcome back to our Georgian Goodies blog series, where we highlight interesting, timely, or just plain nifty documents from the Georgian Papers Programme! Handel’s oratorio “Messiah” is staple of the Christmas season, and December inevitably brings about performances of this piece. However, George Frideric Handel (1685-1759),… Read More »