Posts Tagged ‘18th Century’

Illuminating the Virtuous King George III

Cassandra Good is an assistant professor of History at Marymount University in Arlington, Virginia. She was awarded an Omohundro Institute Georgian Papers Programme fellowship in 2017. Professor Good is currently working on a study of George Washington’s family in the late eighteenth and nineteenth century, examining how the next generation shaped the family’s public image… Read More »

In God’s Hands: Inoculating the Royal Children against Smallpox

In the second of our postings linked to the first release of medical materials among the Georgian Papers, Helen Esfandiary of King’s College London considers inoculation in the royal family. ‘Queen Charlotte (1744-1818) with members of her family’, Johan Zoffany, 1771-72; Royal Collection Trust 401004: the picture includes Ernest duke of Mecklenburg to left, Lady… Read More »

Fading in to the Archives: Queen Charlotte’s (Missing) Papers

By Rachael Krier, Metadata Creator at the Royal Archives Who was Queen Charlotte? Wife of George III and mother to George IV (and many others) is only part of the answer. As with many queens in history, Queen Charlotte is often overshadowed by the larger personalities of her husband George III and her favourite son,… Read More »

Behind the Scenes in the Chapel Royal: The Chapel Royal Memorandum Book

This is a watercolor image of the interior of the Chapel Royal at Whitehall c. 1811. The Chapel Royal at Whitehall was in the former Banqueting House, which was renovated by Sir Christopher Wren after the a 1698 fire. Image courtesy of the British Library.

By Marie Pellissier, Omohundro Institute Apprentice, William & Mary Welcome back to our Georgian Goodies blog series, where we highlight interesting, timely, or just plain nifty documents from the Georgian Papers Programme! What’s so special about the Chapel Royal? That phrase refers not to the building itself, but to the group of people responsible for… Read More »

Ghosts! In the Archives! We Thought You Ought to Know

Portrait of Prince Octavius, a 1782 painting by Thomas Gainsborough, depicting a young boy with long blonde hair.

By Marie Pellissier, Omohundro Institute Apprentice, William & Mary Welcome back to our Georgian Goodies blog series, where we highlight interesting, timely, or just plain nifty documents from the Georgian Papers Programme! It’s almost Halloween! We may or may not have found some ghosts in the archives… but we shall leave the final determination about… Read More »

George III in London: What Hamilton Tells Us About the King’s Role

by Arthur Burns (King’s College London) and Karin Wulf (Omohundro Institute) [After reading this, why not visit our virtual Hamilton and George III exhibition?]   We’ve written before for the Georgian Papers Programme about King George III in American popular culture, and about the importance of Hamilton to that oeuvre.  Seeing Michael Jibson in action in… Read More »

Carving up the Georgian Papers: Metadata and Subject Indexing

By James Fisher, Metadata Assistant for the Georgian Papers Programme at King’s College London. Over the past few months I have been compiling lists of subject headings for indexing the Georgian Papers. This is not nearly as straightforward as it might sound. It requires a detailed knowledge of the papers themselves, a broad awareness of… Read More »

Cataloguing George with John and Lewis!

By Rachael Krier, Metadata Creator at the Royal Archives Over the course of the last few months I have been cataloguing George III’s official correspondence (known more widely as the Calendar). There are 38 large maroon boxes of George III Calendar in total covering the whole of his reign but this release (Summer 2018) focusses… Read More »

Jane Austen and the Prince Regent: The Very First Purchase of an Austen Novel

During his time in the Royal Archives, Omohundro Institute Georgian Papers Programme fellow Nicholas Foretek found exciting new evidence that the first documented purchase of any novel by Jane Austen was made by none other than the Prince Regent (later George IV).  Moreover, the purchase—of Sense and Sensibility—was made two days before the book was advertised… Read More »