The GPP has set out from the start to bring new material to the attention of researchers. There are two key benefits from this research: Firstly, the insights gained from hitherto unused documents can feed into academic and public debate sooner. Secondly, the expertise offered by scholars supports the Royal Archives and Royal Library in understanding the nature and significance of the collections. A number of essays about particular documents can be found below.

  • Diagram of Timmermans' device

    In coordination with Georgian Papers Programme London event Mental Health and the Georgian World,  the GPP transcription site, Transcribe Georgian Papers released three George III medical collections to transcribers. In this post we highlight the three collections, and provide transcription tips – George III medical papers George III’s medical papers primarily cover the Regency era,

  • Sepia portrait of Queen Charlotte

      A new online exhibition has been mounted, curated by Madeleine Pelling and Karin Wulf, exploring evidence in the Georgian papers for the engagement with history and historical writing of women both from the royal family and the court. Explore it here.

  • National Endowment for the Humanities

    The William & Mary Libraries have been awarded a $100,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to support their work with Transkribus, a handwritten text recognition platform. Currently, library staff and student workers use Transkribus to transcribe materials for the Georgian Papers Programme. Transkribus is a computer program which eliminates the need

  • Map

    Peter Walker is a lecturer in History at the University of Wyoming who studies early modern Britain, the British Empire, and the Atlantic World. He received his PhD from Columbia University in 2016 and his MPhil from the University of Oxford in 2010. He held an Omohundro Institute Fellowship for research at Windsor Castle in

  • by Dr Madeleine Pelling (University of York)   For elite and middling women in the eighteenth century, handicrafts including embroidery, decoupage, wood-cutting, turning and spinning were important activities in performing female sociability and manifesting rustic and picturesque ideals. The Georgian Papers Programme has recently digitized a key, though overlooked, album of cut-paper designs created by

  • Queen Caroline, by Jacopo Amigoni

    By Marie Pellissier, Omohundro Institute Apprentice, William & Mary Welcome back to our Georgian Goodies blog series, where we highlight interesting, timely, or just plain nifty documents from the Georgian Papers Programme! “I am transported, my dear friend to understand that your friend is as much an unbeliever as to the rabbits as I am.” 

  •   On 12 March 2019 the Georgian Papers Programme delivered a seminar in the series run by the Digital History seminar at the Institute of Historical Research in London which was livestreamed on YouTube. Samantha Callaghan, Patricia Methven and Arthur Burns discussed and took questions about the importance of metadata and the plans for developing

  • By Dr Michael Rowe, Reader in European History, King’s College London On 20 September 1792, a French army some 32,000 strong defeated a slightly larger force of predominantly Prussian troops near the town of Valmy in north-eastern France. The battle is one of the most important in history. It was by no means the largest

  • Among the most important series of papers which the Georgian Papers Programme is digitizing for public access is George III’s official correspondence, otherwise known as the George III calendar and bearing the Catalogue identity GEO/MAIN. This series contains the main series of letters relating to George III’s involvement with the government of his realm as

  • By Marie Pellissier, Omohundro Institute Apprentice, William & Mary Welcome back to our Georgian Goodies blog series, where we highlight interesting, timely, or just plain nifty documents from the Georgian Papers Programme! On June 24, 1737, King George II signed a warrant authorizing the purchase of furniture for the royal apartments at Hampton Court Palace.