Posts Tagged ‘Expert Opinion’

LESSONS FROM THE AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARY WAR: SIR HENRY CLINTON’S ANALYSIS OF THE ALLIED INVASION OF FRANCE, 1792

By Dr Michael Rowe, Reader in European History, King’s College London On 20 September 1792, a French army some 32,000 strong defeated a slightly larger force of predominantly Prussian troops near the town of Valmy in north-eastern France. The battle is one of the most important in history. It was by no means the largest… Read More »

Sir Lewis Namier’s Additions and Corrections to Sir John Fortescue’s edition of the Correspondence of George III

Among the most important series of papers which the Georgian Papers Programme is digitizing for public access is George III’s official correspondence, otherwise known as the George III calendar and bearing the Catalogue identity GEO/MAIN. This series contains the main series of letters relating to George III’s involvement with the government of his realm as… Read More »

GEORGE III AND THE SEVENTY YEARS WAR, 1744–1815

As we begin to publish the main body of George III’s correspondence, we hope to provide an appropriate context for those approaching this remarkable series for the first time, reflecting the main new approaches that historians have been taking in the years since the bulk of the scholarship on George’s role in the polity was… Read More »

The 18th Century Materializes on Stage

By Karin Wulf and Arthur Burns There is so much eighteenth century on view in the much acclaimed Nottingham Playhouse staging of Alan Bennett’s The Madness of  George III.  The Georgian Papers Programme had a wonderful opportunity to host lead actor Mark Gatiss at Windsor Castle to view some of the archival materials selected to… Read More »

Introducing William IV: A 'sailor king'?

By Andrew Lambert, Laughton Professor of Naval History, Department of War Studies, King’s College London     Often dismissed as most significant as ‘Victoria’s uncle’, William IV, some of whose papers have now been released as part of the Georgian Papers Programme, in fact played a critical role in stabilizing the monarchy after the extravagance,… Read More »

The commonplace books of Lady Augusta Murray

Dr Jane Mycock explores the significance of Lady Augusta Murray’s commonplace books, one of the new tranche of Georgian papers released to the public in February 2018. Augusta married Prince Augustus Frederick, George III’s sixth son, in 1793 in defiance of the Royal Marriage Act of 1772 which required that the monarch agree to all… Read More »

The 2018 Sons of the American Revolution Georgian Papers Programme annual lecture 2018

Professor Gabriel Paquette (The Johns Hopkins University) Spain and the American Revolution Monday 26 March 2018, 6.30 pm Venue: The Great Hall, Strand Campus, King’s College London Professor Paquette lectured on Spain’s role in the American Revolution. He is especially interested in the Anglo-Spanish relationship, and the outbreak of war between these two countries in… Read More »

George I and George II and the Royal Archives: the missing monarchs?

By Dr Andrew Thompson, Queens’ College, Cambridge   George III is the Hanoverian monarch perhaps most frequently associated with the Royal Archives. The king’s own voluminous correspondence forms an important part of the collection and, in the early nineteenth century, his son, as Prince Regent, was instrumental in helping to secure the two collections that… Read More »

Current research in the Georgian papers: a symposium to take stock, Windsor, 4 September 2017

By Arthur Burns, Academic Director of the Georgian Papers Programme, King’s College London As we launch the second tranche of digitized documents for the Georgian Papers project, this is a good moment to reflect on the progress of academic research related to the project. On 4 September 2017 the Royal Archives at Windsor Castle hosted… Read More »