Posts Tagged ‘American Revolution’

Was George III Really A Tyrant?

George III's coronation portrait by Allan Ramsay

By Marie Pellissier, Omohundro Institute Apprentice, William & Mary Welcome back to our Georgian Goodies blog series, where we highlight interesting, timely, or just plain nifty documents from the Georgian Papers Programme! Was George III really a tyrant? The answer to that question certainly depends on who you ask. The writers of the Declaration of Independence,… Read More »

Beginning with George: Rick Atkinson’s The British Are Coming

By Karin Wulf and Arthur Burns     Does the American Revolution begin with George III?  In Rick Atkinson’s new book, The British are Coming: The War for America, Lexington to Princeton, 1775-1777, the first volume in his planned trilogy on the military history of the Revolution, it does.  It begins, in fact, with the… Read More »

William Knox's Counterrevolution

Map

Peter Walker is a lecturer in History at the University of Wyoming who studies early modern Britain, the British Empire, and the Atlantic World. He received his PhD from Columbia University in 2016 and his MPhil from the University of Oxford in 2010. He held an Omohundro Institute Fellowship for research at Windsor Castle in… Read More »

GEORGE III AND THE SEVENTY YEARS WAR, 1744–1815

As we begin to publish the main body of George III’s correspondence, we hope to provide an appropriate context for those approaching this remarkable series for the first time, reflecting the main new approaches that historians have been taking in the years since the bulk of the scholarship on George’s role in the polity was… Read More »

Mapping the Georgian World: video now available!

We are delighted to announce that you can now watch a video-recording of the richly-illustrated event on ‘Mapping the Georgian World – Maps and Power in the reign of George III’ which was delivered to an enthusiastic audience at the 2017 Arts and Humanities Festival at King’s College London on 9 October 2017. The main… Read More »

The 2018 Sons of the American Revolution Georgian Papers Programme annual lecture 2018

Professor Gabriel Paquette (The Johns Hopkins University) Spain and the American Revolution Monday 26 March 2018, 6.30 pm Venue: The Great Hall, Strand Campus, King’s College London Professor Paquette lectured on Spain’s role in the American Revolution. He is especially interested in the Anglo-Spanish relationship, and the outbreak of war between these two countries in… Read More »

Hamilton’s George III in London

by Karin Wulf Hamilton, a quintessentially American story, has arrived in London. While many American commenters and historians have focused on the “Ten Dollar Founding Father without a Father” and his compatriots, the racial politics of the founding period and the intentional casting of the musical, and the gendered politics of the Schuyler sisters and… Read More »

Understanding the American Revolution using George III’s archives

Professor Andrew O’Shaughnessy was the first Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) Visiting Professor in 2016. The generous support from the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) enables visiting professors to bring new perspectives to the study of texts uncovered by the Georgian Papers Programme (GPP). Here Professor O’Shaughnessy reflects on the highlights of his… Read More »

The Admiral and the Aide-de-Camp

The Revolutionary War Correspondence of Sir Samuel Hood and Jacob de Budé by Jim Ambuske, Ph.D. The portrait of one of the most important British naval officers to serve during the American War for Independence hangs in the Manchester Art Gallery in Manchester, England. The 1783 painting by famed artist Sir Joshua Reynolds depicts Rear… Read More »

A Project of Imperative Importance

by Barbara B. Oberg The Georgian Papers Programme at Windsor Castle is an ambitious, collaborative enterprise to digitize and disseminate in searchable form an extraordinarily large and rich collection of letters, state papers, and household ledgers from the Archives of George III. The archives contain internationally significant material for a tumultuous period of military conflict… Read More »