Posts Tagged ‘Research’

Sharing Research: GPP Fellows Flora Fraser & Gabriel Paquette

By Dr Angel Luke O’Donnell, Academic Liaison for the Georgian Papers Programme, and Teaching Fellow in North American History, King’s College London. On 8 June 2017, King’s College London hosted its third GPP fellows coffee morning. The coffee mornings are opportunities for fellows on various schemes to share their research in the archives. The meetings… Read More »

Understanding the American Revolution using George III’s archives

Professor Andrew O’Shaughnessy was the first Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) Visiting Professor in 2016. The generous support from the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) enables visiting professors to bring new perspectives to the study of texts uncovered by the Georgian Papers Programme (GPP). Here Professor O’Shaughnessy reflects on the highlights of his… Read More »

George III’s Visit to Kenwood House in 1794

By Peter Barber, member of the Georgian Papers Programme Steering Committee. Kenwood House is one of the most popular tourist sites in London. This is largely because of its beautiful grounds, the outstanding collection of paintings bequeathed by the first Earl of Iveagh in 1927 and because of the Robert Adam rooms in the house… Read More »

America is Lost!

Dr Angel Luke O’Donnell, Teaching Fellow in North American History, King’s College London Jump to Essay Transcription & Images The ‘America is Lost!’ piece was a short essay written by George III reviewing the causes and effects of the American Revolution. It potentially provides a fascinating insight into the thoughts of King George about the… Read More »

Reflections on ‘Essay on Public Opinion’

Dr Emrys Jones, Lecturer in Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture, King’s College London Jump to Essay Transcription & Images It may be stating the obvious to point out that what was understood as constituting ‘public opinion’ in the eighteenth century bears little resemblance to the culture of opinion polls and click rates that often accompanies the… Read More »

George III and the ‘German Empire’

Dr Michael Rowe, Senior Lecturer in Modern European History, King’s College London George III’s relationship with Germany was less obviously intimate than that enjoyed by his two predecessors. He proudly and very publicly asserted his British identity, at the expense of his Hanoverian roots: ‘Born and educated in this country, I glory in the name… Read More »

Practising monarchy: using digital history to rethink Queen Victoria

Lee Butcher is a Collaborative Doctoral Award PhD researcher with King’s College London and English Heritage As a political historian and political geographer I am interested in how political practices, and institutions, develop over time, in place, and through space. My PhD research focuses on the role of the monarchy in Britain’s political development during… Read More »

The Abdication Speech of George III

Professor Arthur Burns, Vice Dean for Education, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Professor of Modern British History, King’s College London There are few more dramatic incidents in the recent history of the British monarchy than the abdication of Edward VIII on 11 December 1936, not least because the act was captured in such a vivid… Read More »

“Long a Dispute Amongst Antiquarians”: How a King’s Understanding of History Changes our Understanding of a King (and History)

Nathaniel F. Holly, Ph.D. Candidate in History, William & Mary   Jump to Transcription & Images In what is surely one of the best examples of early modern clickbait, King George III laments the loss of Britain’s American possessions with what was must have been a tortured scream of anguish: “America is lost!” But what… Read More »

America Lost? The Birth of Britain’s Capitalist Empire

Justin B. Clement, Ph.D. Candidate in United States History, University of California, Davis Jump to Transcription & Images The 1783 Peace of Paris brought a grueling eight-year war to an end, but its generosity shocked many Britons to the core.  By offering lenient terms in the treaty negotiations, Prime Minister William Petty, Lord Shelburne, hoped… Read More »